<div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:verdana,sans-serif;font-size:x-small">Dear Eric, you asked for literature recommendation explaining the utility of average referencing. I suggest the book &#39;Electric Fields of the Brain&#39;.</div></div><div class="gmail_extra"><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Sat, Oct 4, 2014 at 2:50 AM, Simon Finnigan <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:finnigan.simon@gmail.com" target="_blank">finnigan.simon@gmail.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div dir="auto"><div>Hi All</div><div><br></div><div>Firstly I must say that as a scientist, I find the rationale from Jason via Makoto to be un-scientific and unsatisfactory.</div><div><br></div><div><span>Second - </span><span style="background-color:rgba(255,255,255,0)">This will only partly answer your question I think, but here goes: it all depends on how you&#39;re analysing your data [what you&#39;re looking  at/for] and particularly, whether or not scalp topographies are of interest to you - but in general and in brief, the consensus seems to be that common-average referencing is preferable over mastoid referencing, at least - and probably other references sites too [e.g. vertex; nasion]. [Also are your data referenced to one or both mastoids? and if both - were they linked, or averaged together after recording?]</span><div><span style="background-color:rgba(255,255,255,0)"><br></span></div><div><span style="background-color:rgba(255,255,255,0)">My 2002 paper in &#39;Neuropsychologia&#39; addressed this issue scientifically, at least in part - e.g. see final figure [albeit we weren&#39;t doing ICA back then either!].</span></div><div><span style="background-color:rgba(255,255,255,0)"><br></span></div><div><span style="background-color:rgba(255,255,255,0)">Regards, Simon</span></div></div><div><span style="background-color:rgba(255,255,255,0)"><br></span></div><div><br>On 04/10/2014, at 8:21, Makoto Miyakoshi &lt;<a href="mailto:mmiyakoshi@ucsd.edu" target="_blank">mmiyakoshi@ucsd.edu</a>&gt; wrote:<br><br></div><blockquote type="cite"><div><div dir="ltr">Here is update.<div>I asked the question to Jason. He told me that t<span style="color:rgb(0,0,0);font-family:Calibri,sans-serif;font-size:14.8571424484253px">he main reason avg reference is useful is that it returns brain maps that look like nice localized sources inside the head with red blob and slight negative (aqua/green) background. This makes sense.</span></div><div><br></div><div><span style="color:rgb(0,0,0);font-family:Calibri,sans-serif;font-size:14.8571424484253px">Makoto</span></div></div><div class="gmail_extra"><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Thu, Oct 2, 2014 at 10:00 AM, Makoto Miyakoshi <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:mmiyakoshi@ucsd.edu" target="_blank">mmiyakoshi@ucsd.edu</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div dir="ltr">Dear Eric,<div><br></div><div>I have the same question for long time. In my case, because I run ICA and remain in IC analysis and almost never come back to channels, I really wonder if I need re-referencing at all.</div><div><br></div><div>I&#39;ve heard Jason Palmer, who wrote AMICA for EEGLAB, say average reference before ICA is necessary, but he did not give me a clear explanation for that. Scott wanted to know it too, but we were interrupted at that time. Next time I&#39;ll ask it to him (when I ever see him in the lab...)</div><div><br></div><div>Makoto </div></div><div class="gmail_extra"><br><div class="gmail_quote"><div><div>On Tue, Sep 30, 2014 at 2:44 PM, Eric HG <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:erichg2013@gmail.com" target="_blank">erichg2013@gmail.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br></div></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div><div><div dir="ltr">Dear list,<div><br></div><div>I have read the tutorial on the site and it says: &quot;<span style="color:rgb(0,0,0);font-family:sans-serif;font-size:13px;line-height:19px">Converting data, before analysis, from fixed or common reference (for example, from a common earlobe or other channel reference) to &#39;average reference&#39; is advocated by some researchers, particularly when the electrode montage covers nearly the whole head (as for some high-density recording systems).&quot; </span></div><div><span style="color:rgb(0,0,0);font-family:sans-serif;font-size:13px;line-height:19px"><br></span></div><div><font color="#000000" face="sans-serif"><span style="line-height:19px">I have data collected with a mastoid reference and I was wondering in which cases it would be considered best to rereference to the average? Are there any specific papers about rereferencing that anyone would recommend?</span></font></div><div><font color="#000000" face="sans-serif"><span style="line-height:19px"><br></span></font></div><div><font color="#000000" face="sans-serif"><span style="line-height:19px">Regards,</span></font></div><div><font color="#000000" face="sans-serif"><span style="line-height:19px"><br></span></font></div><div><font color="#000000" face="sans-serif"><span style="line-height:19px">Eric </span></font></div></div>
<br></div></div>_______________________________________________<br>
Eeglablist page: <a href="http://sccn.ucsd.edu/eeglab/eeglabmail.html" target="_blank">http://sccn.ucsd.edu/eeglab/eeglabmail.html</a><br>
To unsubscribe, send an empty email to <a href="mailto:eeglablist-unsubscribe@sccn.ucsd.edu" target="_blank">eeglablist-unsubscribe@sccn.ucsd.edu</a><br>
For digest mode, send an email with the subject &quot;set digest mime&quot; to <a href="mailto:eeglablist-request@sccn.ucsd.edu" target="_blank">eeglablist-request@sccn.ucsd.edu</a><span><font color="#888888"><br></font></span></blockquote></div><span><font color="#888888"><br><br clear="all"><span class="HOEnZb"><font color="#888888"><div><br></div>-- <br><div dir="ltr">Makoto Miyakoshi<br>Swartz Center for Computational Neuroscience<br>Institute for Neural Computation, University of California San Diego<br></div>
</font></span></font></span></div><span class="HOEnZb"><font color="#888888">
</font></span></blockquote></div><span class="HOEnZb"><font color="#888888"><br><br clear="all"><div><br></div>-- <br><div dir="ltr">Makoto Miyakoshi<br>Swartz Center for Computational Neuroscience<br>Institute for Neural Computation, University of California San Diego<br></div>
</font></span></div><span class="HOEnZb"><font color="#888888">
</font></span></div></blockquote><span class="HOEnZb"><font color="#888888"><blockquote type="cite"><div><span>_______________________________________________</span><br><span>Eeglablist page: <a href="http://sccn.ucsd.edu/eeglab/eeglabmail.html" target="_blank">http://sccn.ucsd.edu/eeglab/eeglabmail.html</a></span><br><span>To unsubscribe, send an empty email to <a href="mailto:eeglablist-unsubscribe@sccn.ucsd.edu" target="_blank">eeglablist-unsubscribe@sccn.ucsd.edu</a></span><br><span>For digest mode, send an email with the subject &quot;set digest mime&quot; to <a href="mailto:eeglablist-request@sccn.ucsd.edu" target="_blank">eeglablist-request@sccn.ucsd.edu</a></span></div></blockquote></font></span></div><br>_______________________________________________<br>
Eeglablist page: <a href="http://sccn.ucsd.edu/eeglab/eeglabmail.html" target="_blank">http://sccn.ucsd.edu/eeglab/eeglabmail.html</a><br>
To unsubscribe, send an empty email to <a href="mailto:eeglablist-unsubscribe@sccn.ucsd.edu">eeglablist-unsubscribe@sccn.ucsd.edu</a><br>
For digest mode, send an email with the subject &quot;set digest mime&quot; to <a href="mailto:eeglablist-request@sccn.ucsd.edu">eeglablist-request@sccn.ucsd.edu</a><br></blockquote></div><br></div>