<div dir="ltr">Of course Granger causality can be applied to resting EEG data. Then some people think it&#39;s completely pointless to analyze connectivity at the sensor (scalp) level. Other will say that it&#39;s anyway a useful tool to detect changes in states, provided that you are careful with the speculations of what could possibly happen inside the brain.<div><br></div><div>With resting state recordings it&#39;s more difficult to do an efficient source reconstruction, although it can be done.</div><div><br></div><div>Another thing is that EEG signal is pretty nonlinear, and the standard formulation of GC is limited to the linear case.</div><div>I have developed a tool to detect nonlinear Granger causal interactions, you can find the code here</div><div><a href="http://users.ugent.be/~dmarinaz/KGC.html">http://users.ugent.be/~dmarinaz/KGC.html</a><br></div><div><br></div><div>Or you can consider another tool such as Transfer Entropy</div><div><a href="http://users.ugent.be/~dmarinaz/MuTE.html">http://users.ugent.be/~dmarinaz/MuTE.html</a><br></div><div><a href="http://www.trentool.de/">http://www.trentool.de/</a></div><div><br></div><div>For measures in the frequency domain (such as PDC, DTF) you can take a look at this toolbox</div><div><a href="http://www.science.unitn.it/~nollo/research/sigpro/eMVAR.html">http://www.science.unitn.it/~nollo/research/sigpro/eMVAR.html</a><br></div><div><br></div><div>or Granger Causality in the frequency domain</div><div><a href="http://www.sussex.ac.uk/sackler/mvgc/">http://www.sussex.ac.uk/sackler/mvgc/</a><br></div><div><br></div><div>But keep in mind that these measures are linear, while EEG signals are not.</div><div><br></div><div>or Phase Slope Index</div><div><a href="http://doc.ml.tu-berlin.de/causality/">http://doc.ml.tu-berlin.de/causality/</a><br></div><div><br></div><div>best regards</div></div><div class="gmail_extra"><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Thu, Feb 5, 2015 at 11:51 AM, Eric HG <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:erichg2013@gmail.com" target="_blank">erichg2013@gmail.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div dir="ltr">Hi everybody,<div><br></div><div>Does anyone know whether Granger causality is widely used for resting state EEG data? Or do people use partial directed coherence instead?</div><div><br></div><div>And is there any toolbox with codes for these types of analysis?</div><div><br></div><div>Best regards,</div><div><br></div><div>Eric</div></div>
<br>_______________________________________________<br>
Eeglablist page: <a href="http://sccn.ucsd.edu/eeglab/eeglabmail.html" target="_blank">http://sccn.ucsd.edu/eeglab/eeglabmail.html</a><br>
To unsubscribe, send an empty email to <a href="mailto:eeglablist-unsubscribe@sccn.ucsd.edu">eeglablist-unsubscribe@sccn.ucsd.edu</a><br>
For digest mode, send an email with the subject &quot;set digest mime&quot; to <a href="mailto:eeglablist-request@sccn.ucsd.edu">eeglablist-request@sccn.ucsd.edu</a><br></blockquote></div><br></div>