<div dir="ltr">Dear Iman,<div><br></div><div>I ask you this without testing it, but does the order of the averaging process makes difference in results?</div><div><br></div><div>Makoto</div></div><div class="gmail_extra"><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Mon, Jul 20, 2015 at 10:09 AM, Iman Mohammad-Rezazadeh <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:irezazadeh@ucdavis.edu" target="_blank">irezazadeh@ucdavis.edu</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">





<div lang="EN-US" link="#0563C1" vlink="#954F72">
<div>
<p class="MsoNormal"><u></u> <u></u></p>
<p class="MsoNormal">Hi EEGLABERs, <u></u><u></u></p>
<p class="MsoNormal">I have been looking into ‘newcrossf’ function and the way it calculates coherence for epoched data. Basically, it uses the ‘timefreq’ function to calculate the time/frequency decomposition the data.  ‘timefreq’ function treats the epoched
 data as a continuous one:<u></u><u></u></p>
<p class="MsoNormal" style="text-autospace:none"><span style="font-size:10.0pt;font-family:&quot;Courier New&quot;;color:black"><u></u> <u></u></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal" style="text-autospace:none"><span style="font-size:10.0pt;font-family:&quot;Courier New&quot;;color:black">X = reshape(X, g.frame, g.trials);</span><span style="font-size:12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Courier New&quot;"><u></u><u></u></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal" style="text-autospace:none"><span style="font-size:10.0pt;font-family:&quot;Courier New&quot;;color:black">[alltfX freqs timesout] = timefreq(X, g.srate, spectraloptions{:});</span><span style="font-size:12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Courier New&quot;"><u></u><u></u></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal" style="text-autospace:none"><span style="font-size:10.0pt;font-family:&quot;Courier New&quot;;color:black"><u></u> <u></u></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal" style="text-autospace:none"><span style="font-size:10.0pt;font-family:&quot;Courier New&quot;;color:black">Y = reshape(Y, g.frame, g.trials);<u></u><u></u></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal" style="text-autospace:none"><span style="font-size:10.0pt;font-family:&quot;Courier New&quot;;color:black">[alltfY] = timefreq(Y, g.srate, spectraloptions{:});</span><span style="font-size:12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Courier New&quot;"><u></u><u></u></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><u></u> <u></u></p>
<p class="MsoNormal">and calculates the its spectrum using the whole data which is now concatenated version of all trials.  So, for each of channel’s pair (X and Y , for example) the spectrum is calculated as described above and then the joint time-freq decomposition
 is calculated for coherence value.<u></u><u></u></p>
<p class="MsoNormal" style="text-autospace:none"><span style="font-size:10.0pt;font-family:&quot;Courier New&quot;;color:black"><u></u> <u></u></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal" style="text-autospace:none"><span style="font-size:10.0pt;font-family:&quot;Courier New&quot;;color:black">coherres = sum(alltfX .* conj(alltfY), 3) ./ sqrt( sum(abs(alltfX).^2,3) .* sum(abs(alltfY).^2,3) );</span><span style="font-size:12.0pt;font-family:&quot;Courier New&quot;"><u></u><u></u></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><u></u> <u></u></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><b>However, similar to the ERSP concept, each trial/epoch might be different than others [because of perturbations in subjects’ mental status, mental fatigue, etc] and thus I think it is more appropriate to calculate the coherence for each
 trial first and then make the average across trials.<u></u><u></u></b></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><u></u> <u></u></p>
<p class="MsoNormal">Any thoughts?<span class="HOEnZb"><font color="#888888"><u></u><u></u></font></span></p><span class="HOEnZb"><font color="#888888">
<p class="MsoNormal">Iman  <u></u><u></u></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><u></u> <u></u></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><u></u> <u></u></p>
</font></span></div>
</div>

</blockquote></div><br><br clear="all"><div><br></div>-- <br><div class="gmail_signature"><div dir="ltr">Makoto Miyakoshi<br>Swartz Center for Computational Neuroscience<br>Institute for Neural Computation, University of California San Diego<br></div></div>
</div>