<div dir="ltr">Dear Andreas,<div><br></div><div>I have been wondering about this but keep forgetting to ask you about it:<br></div><div><br></div><div>&gt; no stopband (below Nyquist)</div><div><br></div><div>Why do you need to avoid having a stopband below Nyquist?</div><div>I appreciate your kind help.</div><div><br></div><div>Makoto</div><div><br><div class="gmail_extra"><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Wed, Jun 24, 2015 at 4:02 AM, Andreas Widmann <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:widmann@uni-leipzig.de" target="_blank">widmann@uni-leipzig.de</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left-width:1px;border-left-color:rgb(204,204,204);border-left-style:solid;padding-left:1ex">Dear Makoto,<br>
<br>
to my understanding filter causality and Granger causality are not directly related. The output of a causal linear filter is identical to the output of a non-causal linear filter but shifted on the time axis (delayed; but equally across channels and bands!). Non-linear (here min phase) filters distort the phase spectrum and should, to my understanding, not be used for GC analysis.<br>
<br>
Barnett and Seth (2011, J Neurosci Meth) show that GC is in theory (but not in practice) invariant under filtering. They do recommend filtering to achieve stationarity (e.g., drift, line noise; also in recent 2015 J Neurosci paper). The main problem with filtering and GC is the increase in required model order (&quot;We have shown that a primary cause is the large increase in empirical model induced by filtering; high model orders become necessary in order to properly fit the modified aspects of the power spectrum (low power in stop band, steep roll-off, etc.).“).<br>
<br>
That is, to my understanding for a carefully designed anti-aliasing filter (linear, zero-phase) the impact should be limited. The anti-aliasing filter as it is implemented in the repaired pop_resample function (in develop but not yet in eeglab13 branch) will have no stopband (below Nyquist) and a rather shallow roll-off (and low order) with default cutoff (fc = 0.9 * Nyq) and transition band width (df = 0.2 * Nyq). The cutoff and transition band width can be manually defined by the user, so you can try to apply a more shallow roll-off, e.g. with fc = 0.8 and df = 0.4. This conclusion should, however, be actually tested with a simulation. From a practical perspective any M/EEG signal has been filtered with an anti-aliasing filter.<br>
<span class=""><br>
&gt; As the ERP handbook by Luck (or his other book) recommends, anti-aliasing should better have the margin of 4-5 times of the new sampling rate e.g. if you downsample signlas to 250 Hz, anti-aliasing low-pass at 125 Hz is the standard, but recommendation is 75 Hz or even 50 Hz. Well, I haven&#39;t tested it myself so I am not sure what bad it would do if I use 125 Hz (any comment on this, anyone?) but in this case, I guess the anti-aliasing low-pass filter does affect the subsequest connectivity analysis--am I correct (assuming that I analyze EEG up to 50 Hz)?<br>
</span>To my understanding this conservative oversampling ratio is intended to improve signal fidelity (resolution, noise) rather than anti-aliasing alone. Given the result demonstrated by Barnett and Seth I would not recommend applying a lowpass filter with a stopband below Nyquist.<br>
<br>
Best,<br>
Andreas<br>
<div class=""><div class="h5"><br>
&gt; Am 24.06.2015 um 02:59 schrieb Makoto Miyakoshi &lt;<a href="mailto:mmiyakoshi@ucsd.edu">mmiyakoshi@ucsd.edu</a>&gt;:<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; Dear Iman,<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; &gt; Using causal filter may adversely effect the direction of information<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; flow in the GC analysis. It is recommended that one use a<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; non-causal filter (for example, finite impulse response filters) with<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; zero phase lag<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; Really? The impulse response of the non-causal FIR filter spreads in both ways in the time domain, which means info of future events leak to past... I thought using causal filter with minimum phase makes more sense.<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; Makoto<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; On Tue, Jun 23, 2015 at 4:29 PM, Iman Mohammad-Rezazadeh &lt;<a href="mailto:irezazadeh@ucdavis.edu">irezazadeh@ucdavis.edu</a>&gt; wrote:<br>
&gt; <a href="http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fnhum.2015.00194/abstract" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fnhum.2015.00194/abstract</a><br>
&gt;<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; Using causal filter may adversely effect the direction of information<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; flow in the GC analysis. It is recommended that one use a<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; non-causal filter (for example, finite impulse response filters) with<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; zero phase lag (Mullen et al., 2012, Coben and Rezazadeh, 2015)<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; From: <a href="mailto:eeglablist-bounces@sccn.ucsd.edu">eeglablist-bounces@sccn.ucsd.edu</a> [mailto:<a href="mailto:eeglablist-bounces@sccn.ucsd.edu">eeglablist-bounces@sccn.ucsd.edu</a>] On Behalf Of Makoto Miyakoshi<br>
&gt; Sent: Tuesday, June 23, 2015 2:07 PM<br>
&gt; To: Vito De Feo<br>
&gt; Cc: EEGLAB List<br>
&gt; Subject: Re: [Eeglablist] Effect of anti-aliasing low-pass filter on connectivity analysis<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; Thank you Vito for your response. Forgive me to ask you one more question.<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; As the ERP handbook by Luck (or his other book) recommends, anti-aliasing should better have the margin of 4-5 times of the new sampling rate e.g. if you downsample signlas to 250 Hz, anti-aliasing low-pass at 125 Hz is the standard, but recommendation is 75 Hz or even 50 Hz. Well, I haven&#39;t tested it myself so I am not sure what bad it would do if I use 125 Hz (any comment on this, anyone?) but in this case, I guess the anti-aliasing low-pass filter does affect the subsequest connectivity analysis--am I correct (assuming that I analyze EEG up to 50 Hz)?<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; Makoto<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; On Mon, Jun 22, 2015 at 9:31 AM, Vito De Feo &lt;<a href="mailto:vito.defeo@zmnh.uni-hamburg.de">vito.defeo@zmnh.uni-hamburg.de</a>&gt; wrote:<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; Dear Makoto,<br>
&gt; this will not affect the connectivity analysis if the frequency of interest are far from the Nyquist frequency. For example if you downsample to 500 Hz (Nyquist freq = 250 Hz) you will have no problem in the band 0-100 Hz.<br>
&gt; Best<br>
&gt; Vito<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; Il giorno 20/giu/2015, alle ore 00:28, Makoto Miyakoshi ha scritto:<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; &gt; Dear List,<br>
&gt; &gt;<br>
&gt; &gt; If I use zero-phase low-pass filter for anti-aliasing, does it affect the subsequent connectivity analysis? I ask this because EEGLAB pop_resample() automatically applies it. If it does, is there a workaround? Should I use minimum phase causal filter for anti-aliasing?<br>
&gt; &gt;<br>
&gt; &gt; --<br>
&gt; &gt; Makoto Miyakoshi<br>
&gt; &gt; Swartz Center for Computational Neuroscience<br>
&gt; &gt; Institute for Neural Computation, University of California San Diego<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; &gt; _______________________________________________<br>
&gt; &gt; Eeglablist page: <a href="http://sccn.ucsd.edu/eeglab/eeglabmail.html" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">http://sccn.ucsd.edu/eeglab/eeglabmail.html</a><br>
&gt; &gt; To unsubscribe, send an empty email to <a href="mailto:eeglablist-unsubscribe@sccn.ucsd.edu">eeglablist-unsubscribe@sccn.ucsd.edu</a><br>
&gt; &gt; For digest mode, send an email with the subject &quot;set digest mime&quot; to <a href="mailto:eeglablist-request@sccn.ucsd.edu">eeglablist-request@sccn.ucsd.edu</a><br>
&gt;<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; --<br>
&gt; Pflichtangaben gemäß Gesetz über elektronische Handelsregister und Genossenschaftsregister sowie das Unternehmensregister (EHUG):<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; Universitätsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf<br>
&gt; Körperschaft des öffentlichen Rechts<br>
&gt; Gerichtsstand: Hamburg<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; Vorstandsmitglieder:<br>
&gt; Prof. Dr. Burkhard Göke (Vorsitzender)<br>
&gt; Prof. Dr. Dr. Uwe Koch-Gromus<br>
&gt; Joachim Prölß<br>
&gt; Rainer Schoppik<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; --<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; Makoto Miyakoshi<br>
&gt; Swartz Center for Computational Neuroscience<br>
&gt; Institute for Neural Computation, University of California San Diego<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; --<br>
&gt; Makoto Miyakoshi<br>
&gt; Swartz Center for Computational Neuroscience<br>
&gt; Institute for Neural Computation, University of California San Diego<br>
&gt; _______________________________________________<br>
&gt; Eeglablist page: <a href="http://sccn.ucsd.edu/eeglab/eeglabmail.html" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">http://sccn.ucsd.edu/eeglab/eeglabmail.html</a><br>
&gt; To unsubscribe, send an empty email to <a href="mailto:eeglablist-unsubscribe@sccn.ucsd.edu">eeglablist-unsubscribe@sccn.ucsd.edu</a><br>
&gt; For digest mode, send an email with the subject &quot;set digest mime&quot; to <a href="mailto:eeglablist-request@sccn.ucsd.edu">eeglablist-request@sccn.ucsd.edu</a><br>
<br>
</div></div></blockquote></div><br><br clear="all"><div><br></div>-- <br><div class="gmail_signature"><div dir="ltr">Makoto Miyakoshi<br>Swartz Center for Computational Neuroscience<br>Institute for Neural Computation, University of California San Diego<br></div></div>
</div></div></div>