<div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_default" style="color:rgb(51,51,153)">Hello Julia, some notes below.</div><div class="gmail_default" style="color:rgb(51,51,153)"><br></div><div class="gmail_default" style="color:rgb(51,51,153)"><br></div><div class="gmail_default" style="color:rgb(51,51,153)">*************************************************************************************************</div><div class="gmail_default" style="color:rgb(51,51,153)">WIth 20 channels your ICs will likely not be that great, though you should get a few neural ICs, and also some artifactual ones that you could remove.</div><div class="gmail_default" style="color:rgb(51,51,153)"><br></div><div class="gmail_default" style="color:rgb(51,51,153)">Some investigators are quite cautious about IC removal, and only remove clear artifacts.</div><div class="gmail_default" style="color:rgb(51,51,153)">Some investigators are focused on only using clearly neural ICs, and/or rebuilding their data with just clearly neural ICs.</div><div class="gmail_default" style="color:rgb(51,51,153)">It depends on their understanding and experience and biases. </div><div class="gmail_default" style="color:rgb(51,51,153)">try to err on the side of caution unless you have clear reasons that you can report for dropping some ICs.</div><div class="gmail_default" style="color:rgb(51,51,153)"><br></div><div class="gmail_default" style="color:rgb(51,51,153)">Also, think about just focusing analysis on just two or three clear neural ICs rather than &quot;rebuilding&quot; the data after IC dropping.</div><div class="gmail_default" style="color:rgb(51,51,153)"><br></div><div class="gmail_default" style="color:rgb(51,51,153)">What you need to determine is whether yours is artifactual or not. If it&#39;s not dipolar, does not have a clear frequency peak, and does not take a lot of variance,</div><div class="gmail_default" style="color:rgb(51,51,153)">then you can probably safely remove it. </div><div class="gmail_default" style="color:rgb(51,51,153)"><br></div><div class="gmail_default" style="color:rgb(51,51,153)">However as a caveat, with sparse EEG such as yours, you want to think about trying to retain information that you are not sure is artitifactual or not.</div><div class="gmail_default" style="color:rgb(51,51,153)"><br></div><div class="gmail_default" style="color:rgb(51,51,153)">You may also run analyses to compare two different strategies (keeping the ones you&#39;re not sure about) and (removing them), which you may also report on.</div><div class="gmail_default" style="color:rgb(51,51,153)"><br></div><div class="gmail_default" style="color:rgb(51,51,153)"><br></div><div class="gmail_default" style="color:rgb(51,51,153)">If you have not had a chance to yet:</div><div class="gmail_default" style="color:rgb(51,51,153)"><br></div><div class="gmail_default" style="color:rgb(51,51,153)">Review the online EEGLAB ICA detection site, which has more information about what constitutes weird non-neural ICs, which might be what you are seeing.</div><div class="gmail_default" style="color:rgb(51,51,153)"><pre style="white-space:pre-wrap;color:rgb(0,0,0)"><i><a href="http://reaching.ucsd.edu:8000">http://reaching.ucsd.edu:8000</a> </i></pre></div><div class="gmail_default" style="color:rgb(51,51,153)"><br></div><div class="gmail_default" style="color:rgb(51,51,153)">Please review if you have not had a chance the PLos article from the SCCN team about different IC functions and what makes IC good:</div><div class="gmail_default" style="color:rgb(51,51,153)"><br></div><div class="gmail_default"><font color="#333399"><a href="http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0030135">http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0030135</a></font><br></div><div class="gmail_default"><font color="#333399"><br></font></div><div class="gmail_default"><font color="#333399"><br></font></div><div class="gmail_default"><font color="#333399">Please also review the Onton and Makeig chapter in Luck&#39;s ERP Handbook about ICA for EEG.</font></div><div class="gmail_default" style="color:rgb(51,51,153)"><br></div><div class="gmail_default" style="color:rgb(51,51,153)">Please also google past eeglab list posts on similar topics.</div><div class="gmail_default" style="color:rgb(51,51,153)"><br></div><div class="gmail_extra"><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Wed, Apr 5, 2017 at 11:24 AM, Julia Basso <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:jb4590@nyu.edu" target="_blank">jb4590@nyu.edu</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex"><div dir="ltr"><span style="font-size:12.8px">Dear all,</span><div style="font-size:12.8px"><br></div><div style="font-size:12.8px">I have a 20 channel EEG system and after cleaning the data by first conducting a band pass filter than cleaning epoched data by visual inspection, I am running ICA to detect and remove eye blinks and eye movements.  </div><div style="font-size:12.8px"><br></div><div style="font-size:12.8px">My question is in regards to ICs that are distinctly all blue or all red.  <span style="font-size:12.8px">My instinct is to remove these ICs (and when I do, the data looks cleaner)- but I wanted to get your opinion.  What does this type of IC indicate?  Is it merely noise in the system?</span></div><div style="font-size:12.8px"><br></div><div style="font-size:12.8px">Best,</div><div style="font-size:12.8px"><br></div><div style="font-size:12.8px">Julia</div><span class="gmail-m_5883811542012396411HOEnZb"><font color="#888888"><div><br></div>-- <br><div class="gmail-m_5883811542012396411m_438107368812088609gmail_signature"><div dir="ltr"><div><div dir="ltr"><div><div dir="ltr"><i>Julia C. Basso, PhD, CYT</i><div><i>Post-doctoral Research Associate</i></div><div><i><br></i></div><div><i>New York University</i></div><div><i>Center for Neural Science</i></div><div><i>Suzuki Laboratory</i></div><div><i>4 Washington Place, Room 809</i></div><div><i>New York, NY  10003</i></div><div><i><a href="tel:(212)%20998-3969" value="+12129983969" target="_blank">(212) 998-3969</a></i></div><div><span style="font-size:12.8px"><a href="http://www.juliabasso.com" target="_blank">www.juliabasso.com</a></span></div><div><i style="font-size:12.8px"><a href="http://www.suzukilab.com" target="_blank">www.suzukilab.com</a></i></div><div><br></div></div></div></div></div></div></div>
</font></span></div>
<br>______________________________<wbr>_________________<br>
Eeglablist page: <a href="http://sccn.ucsd.edu/eeglab/eeglabmail.html" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">http://sccn.ucsd.edu/eeglab/ee<wbr>glabmail.html</a><br>
To unsubscribe, send an empty email to <a href="mailto:eeglablist-unsubscribe@sccn.ucsd.edu" target="_blank">eeglablist-unsubscribe@sccn.uc<wbr>sd.edu</a><br>
For digest mode, send an email with the subject &quot;set digest mime&quot; to <a href="mailto:eeglablist-request@sccn.ucsd.edu" target="_blank">eeglablist-request@sccn.ucsd.e<wbr>du</a><br></blockquote></div><br></div></div>